Comments on: Vasudeo Gaitonde: Abstract Art and the Pre-Calligraphic http://abstractcritical.com/note/vasudeo-gaitonde-abstract-art-and-the-pre-calligraphic/ Abstract Critical is a not-for profit company aiming to establish a new critical context for all generations of artists involved with ambitious abstract art. Sun, 09 Nov 2014 17:23:33 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Robert Linsley http://abstractcritical.com/note/vasudeo-gaitonde-abstract-art-and-the-pre-calligraphic/#comment-487318 Sun, 20 Apr 2014 23:32:08 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=8015#comment-487318 Also, by the way, the work is universal if we start talking about it, and anyone, in any context is entitled to do so, and ignorance of many details of Indian life and art don’t invalidate anyone’s thoughts.

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By: Robert Linsley http://abstractcritical.com/note/vasudeo-gaitonde-abstract-art-and-the-pre-calligraphic/#comment-487313 Sun, 20 Apr 2014 23:29:05 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=8015#comment-487313 Katrina, thanks for your comments. I’m guessing that you are the same Katrina who wrote the article on Kim Lim. Whenever I encounter that kind of deep focus on one real experience I always feel inspired, and a little challenged. I can’t see the show because I’m across an ocean, but have no trouble following your feelings as you spent time with the work. But though I Iike condensed emotion and patient attention in the end I kind of prefer change. A more sparkly, jumping kind of experience. That’s probably why I like Stella.

Gaitonde seems to have a lot of that meditative quality, and the works get better as you look at them. He’s a great example of a provincial artist who made his own direction and stuck to it, and it turns out to be a good direction. He found out what those kind of shapes are worth, by making them, and making them thoughtfully and with feeling. Integrity seems to be the word, and that’s how he is seen in India. But there’s lots about Gaitonde I don’t understand. One piece, from 1959, is called Homi Bhaba study, and it turns out that Homi Bhaba was the main force behind India’s nuclear program, including the bomb, and apparently close to Gaitonde. Knowing that changed my perception of the generative or emergent quality. I think that’s a legitimate response because this work is always on the cusp of imagery.

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By: Katrina http://abstractcritical.com/note/vasudeo-gaitonde-abstract-art-and-the-pre-calligraphic/#comment-487097 Sun, 20 Apr 2014 20:59:14 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=8015#comment-487097 Thank you so much for spotlighting this painter. I wish I could see the show. I liked what you said about them being emergent – suggesting that they are also ‘enquiring’ paintings – not that they present the artist’s enquiry but that they ‘are’ a visual dialogue. I really like the almost monochromatic proposition and of course the calligraphic inference perhaps even insistence. I know we are supposed to be careful about using the word ‘universal’ as an attribute of abstract art but I think he is close here. For me they transcend any ism. I am reminded of artists such as Afro Basaldella and Serge Poliakoff who I like to look at – perhaps not ‘calligraphic’ in this way but there is a consistency of visual thought in the way they work which is so sophisticated. A relief for me after reading lots of words about (British) abstract expressionism which I find hard to understand. I wondered what you thought of the Kim Lim?

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