Comments on: The Black Square, Part 2 http://abstractcritical.com/note/the-black-square-part-2/ Abstract Critical is a not-for profit company aiming to establish a new critical context for all generations of artists involved with ambitious abstract art. Sun, 09 Nov 2014 17:23:33 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Mark Liebenrood http://abstractcritical.com/note/the-black-square-part-2/#comment-834651 Wed, 03 Sep 2014 11:06:07 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=8413#comment-834651 Onya Mccausland says Malevich’s Black Square was not the first abstract ‘monochrome’ painting. What was?

]]>
By: Peter Stott http://abstractcritical.com/note/the-black-square-part-2/#comment-791678 Fri, 22 Aug 2014 17:19:52 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=8413#comment-791678 http://youtu.be/AiCmAX4WQjA

The politics of now, regarding the medium is the message, the every increasing resolution of the actual media, as graphics technology advances abstract art increasingly becomes the product advertised. The ultimate art revolution?

]]>
By: Peter Stott http://abstractcritical.com/note/the-black-square-part-2/#comment-771383 Sun, 17 Aug 2014 14:33:56 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=8413#comment-771383 Bathos,pathos,irony. The transcendental is occluded in many ways, some more subtle than others.

]]>
By: anthony seymour http://abstractcritical.com/note/the-black-square-part-2/#comment-763497 Fri, 15 Aug 2014 14:10:15 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=8413#comment-763497 I reckon my own painting is better than Malevich’s black square really!

]]>
By: Peter Stott http://abstractcritical.com/note/the-black-square-part-2/#comment-763259 Fri, 15 Aug 2014 13:06:06 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=8413#comment-763259 Like all this First World War stuff. “Lest we forget” hah! It’s all designed so that one will forget the present.

]]>
By: Peter Stott http://abstractcritical.com/note/the-black-square-part-2/#comment-763233 Fri, 15 Aug 2014 12:58:16 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=8413#comment-763233 The media machine of now, actively promotes shows like Malevich, and promotes it via Tate Modern AS THE AVANT GARDE OF NOW, to de-balls art further and keep the power of the visual even more in the hands of the media. That’s how Malevich is political, as a pawn.

]]>
By: Peter Stott http://abstractcritical.com/note/the-black-square-part-2/#comment-763207 Fri, 15 Aug 2014 12:50:47 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=8413#comment-763207 In any case, if the graphic technology were to be developed, then the first thing that would happen is that it would fall into the hands of the media and big business. I tried to own it to stop that, but I couldn’t because I didn’t have the computer algorithms to back up the visual model.

]]>
By: Peter Stott http://abstractcritical.com/note/the-black-square-part-2/#comment-763183 Fri, 15 Aug 2014 12:40:51 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=8413#comment-763183 I think your talking about transcendent form here, what a picture’s potential is, outside of any ideology; the greater picture within the smaller picture, as it were. But it’s highly unlikely that will affect politics and what it does, run a country and control and advise its populace, for better or worse. With my patent application I attempted out-think the media by claiming the next level of graphics technology. The image is central to all visual media, so any technology of image is critical in the battle to control the image’s power in the hands of the media. Of course, I failed. I knew it would fail as it stands because the maths to work out the idea, hasn’t yet been done. Computer vision research hasn’t got as far as inventing projective form/space values for 2D shapes, hence there’s no transcendental form realization in computer graphics or art, just simulacrumss, pastiches, the worst kind of imagery, a sort of living hell, thumping everyone who watches TV. However, the visual model I set out, can be applied to any imagery, including abstract art. If a knowledge of how transcendental visions become, becomes more widespread, then there’s a chance one can see through the media’s current power tools, see them for the empty drivel they are. That might lessen the media’s grip on the visual. That’s the political angenda for the 21st C, not little paintings by individuals. Even Guernica never stopped a single bomb being dropped, one has to accept the relatively little power art now has, in the political battle for the control of the visual.

]]>
By: John Pollard http://abstractcritical.com/note/the-black-square-part-2/#comment-762561 Fri, 15 Aug 2014 09:14:02 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=8413#comment-762561 If one’s politics include a commitment to freedom, equality, true democracy, challenging abuses of power, flattening hierarchies, etc it may be that an approach to abstraction that encourages and empowers the viewer to think for themselves about the meaning and value of the work of art, and lessens any authority outside of this individual, is a worthwhile political ideal.

I have always found it slightly disconcerting when someone wants me to explain the meaning of a painting for them. This is an analogous process to the one I sometimes have as therapist when a client may be looking at me for the answers to their problems rather than as a facilitator to their own discoveries, abilities, answers, etc.

So, perhaps one political ambition for abstraction means focusing on the visual qualities of the object and letting it have a life of its own when it is finished: less power to the artist and more power to the individual object of art and its viewer/s. We have to let the painting go……

]]>
By: anthony seymour http://abstractcritical.com/note/the-black-square-part-2/#comment-759261 Thu, 14 Aug 2014 14:29:55 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=8413#comment-759261 invigorating to read this Robin – its like I always thought at art school in the mid-Ninties but everybody seemed to think I was being immoral painting as such and all the side-tracked chorus become stodgy, but at least Robin is engaged in a more worthwhile direction.

]]>