Comments on: Nicolas de Staël at Mitchell-Innes & Nash http://abstractcritical.com/note/nicolas-de-stael-at-mitchell-innes-nash/ Abstract Critical is a not-for profit company aiming to establish a new critical context for all generations of artists involved with ambitious abstract art. Sun, 09 Nov 2014 17:23:33 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: John Pollard http://abstractcritical.com/note/nicolas-de-stael-at-mitchell-innes-nash/#comment-168774 Mon, 27 May 2013 20:36:49 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=6991#comment-168774 I have nothing profound to say other than I think that De Staël, at his best, handles, arranges, paint and space as well as anyone in the 20th century.
‘Georgeous’ comes to mind.
I wish he had stuck around, painting, for a couple of more decades.
Though I have never liked his footie paintings, for some reason.

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By: patrick jones http://abstractcritical.com/note/nicolas-de-stael-at-mitchell-innes-nash/#comment-168056 Sun, 26 May 2013 15:22:44 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=6991#comment-168056 I didnt realise how influenced John Hoyland was by de Stael,until I read Mel Goodings monograph.Of course its obvious when you look at the palette -knife paintings after he returned from New York,in the 70s.But its not just the knife ,as Robin rightly points out.He had rejected Colour Field painting in favour of Hoffman,and Northern European Romantic painting.Altho friendly with Motherwell,Frankenthaler and Newman,he ditched elegance for something far more cluttered and disturbing.

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By: Robin Greenwood http://abstractcritical.com/note/nicolas-de-stael-at-mitchell-innes-nash/#comment-166992 Fri, 24 May 2013 19:08:47 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=6991#comment-166992 Really good to see this, and though I can’t admit to De Staël being a truly great painter, he is a very, very good one. His work seems to me to have very strong embedded visual content (and not because he is semi-figurative) which returns you always to what you are looking at. By comparison, the New York School in the fifties are made to seem overwrought in their subject-matter and undercooked in their achievements, Hofmann aside; and though they bring to abstract painting other qualities, they do, as Brett suggests, presage the conceptual in a way that De Staël utterly resists.

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