Comments on: John Panting: Sculpture http://abstractcritical.com/note/john-panting-sculpture/ Abstract Critical is a not-for profit company aiming to establish a new critical context for all generations of artists involved with ambitious abstract art. Sun, 09 Nov 2014 17:23:33 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Richard de Bulat http://abstractcritical.com/note/john-panting-sculpture/#comment-262609 Sun, 06 Oct 2013 19:14:00 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=6189#comment-262609 I was a student of John’s from 1972 and remember receiving the information of his death. John was a great communicator, often challenging and, as often difficult to follow, but always persuasive. I remember seeing these works in his studio and something he said about them, which is that he always felt the need to have some element of horizontality in each of the works. He was fascinated by structure and the problem of getting forms in the air using opposing forces to get them to hang there. He was also interested in randomness, at least in the sense of breaking with habits, creating joints and joins in different ways, making these structures closer to organisms that are sculptural: I suppose, in this way, there is a close connection with the works of Pollock, but it is not one that I had ever heard him refer to, although many talks did refer to the abstract expressionists.

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By: Terry Ryall http://abstractcritical.com/note/john-panting-sculpture/#comment-55726 Mon, 15 Oct 2012 11:33:26 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=6189#comment-55726 Sam, it’s unfortunate that this discussion hasn’t been developed by some of your fellow regular ‘heavyweight’ contributors. As well as having an appealing main proposition it also contains a potential progression to the difficulties that can be encountered by individuals who make both sculpture and painting and who are seeking to find some common ground between the two activities within their own practice. Whilst all credit is due to Dan Coombs’s for instigating the thoroughly entertaining exchanges relating to Eric Bainbridge’s work the seeds of a more serious (if that doesn’t sound too pompous) discussion are to be found here.

For the reasons that both you and Noela state with regard to the artists’ respective differences of pace and methods of making it would be surprising if the visual similarities between Panting’s sculpture and Pollock’s drip paintings were anything more than superficial. Whilst they can both be described as complex composers Pollock is all Baroque,immediate energy. Panting is drawing on a very different practical and mental resource and the visual evidence for that,in my view, over-powers any similiarities.

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By: Sam Cornish http://abstractcritical.com/note/john-panting-sculpture/#comment-54953 Tue, 09 Oct 2012 05:47:18 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=6189#comment-54953 I think you are right. Though I would look at from the viewer’s perspective; there is a instantaneous quality in Pollock that would I think be far from the slowness of exploring the complexity and space of Panting’s sculpture. However I still don’t think their similarity is totally superficial. Maybe they would have to looked at alongside each other before final conclusions could be drawn…?

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By: Noela Bewry http://abstractcritical.com/note/john-panting-sculpture/#comment-54575 Thu, 04 Oct 2012 18:59:26 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=6189#comment-54575 Wildly expressive yet acutely controlled would apply to both Panting and Pollock, yet the practice and outcome feel like they come from different routes.
I imagine the mere act of constructing these amazing, seemingly precarious sculptures , would have tapped into a different mindset from the kind needed to perform the rhythm and flow of Pollock’s work.

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