Comments on: highways and byways. together again. http://abstractcritical.com/note/highways-and-byways-together-again/ Abstract Critical is a not-for profit company aiming to establish a new critical context for all generations of artists involved with ambitious abstract art. Sun, 09 Nov 2014 17:23:33 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Alan Gouk http://abstractcritical.com/note/highways-and-byways-together-again/#comment-337708 Mon, 16 Dec 2013 06:57:17 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=7720#comment-337708 Yes. Reminds me of the big show of British art at the Royal Academy curated by Norman Rosenthal in the early 90′s ? , where Prairie was placed in the centre of the School of London and had to be policed by none other than Rosenthal himself to prevent people bumping into it. What idiocy!.

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By: Sam http://abstractcritical.com/note/highways-and-byways-together-again/#comment-335062 Fri, 13 Dec 2013 19:05:57 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=7720#comment-335062 Just noticed something similar in Tate B’s new re-hang. I’m sure everyone with any interest in modernist sculpture would have noticed and been annoyed at the way Hockney’s Bigger Splash is positioned so it seems to float above the long horizontal axis of Caro’s Early One Morning – it obviously prevents you seeing EOM properly. Which is quite a problem considering it is one of the few stand-out modernist masterpieces in the Tate’s collection (Matisse the Snail perhaps the only other one).

At first I thought this was just careless or visually illiterate. But today I realised that the swimming board which projects from the bottom edge of the Hockney visually rhymes with the square horizontal plane at the centre of the Caro (from a particular angle they line up so one seems to continue the other) and the splash in the Hockney mirrors the two large prongs in Caro. The visual disruption is certainly intentional and a great sculpture is made into a cheap visual gag, a curatorial in-joke. Is this really good enough? At the least the above exhibition is overt and temporary.

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By: Matt http://abstractcritical.com/note/highways-and-byways-together-again/#comment-333083 Wed, 11 Dec 2013 17:54:18 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=7720#comment-333083 Looks like more curator nonsense.

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By: David Evison http://abstractcritical.com/note/highways-and-byways-together-again/#comment-329240 Sun, 08 Dec 2013 12:03:31 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=7720#comment-329240 I wonder what arguments Kuratorin Renate Wiehager used to persuade the trustees of Daimler Contemporary Berlin to allow a graffiti artist with sweet taste to decorate their gallery, and use some of their collection as props for his limp designs.
The collection of abstract art is second rate, and knowing this, all concerned may have thought that by sexing it up, the show would draw crowds. I was there on a Saturday afternoon and only three other people were present. Seems like it’s a flop.

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By: Geoffrey Pimlott http://abstractcritical.com/note/highways-and-byways-together-again/#comment-325876 Thu, 05 Dec 2013 16:11:03 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=7720#comment-325876 The pics show a good, meaningful presentation of abstract art. What the hell is there need for a hare’s backside, sticking out of a panel? What is the meaning? I know the mythological, age old, stories of the hare. What has that got to do with these paintings? It suggests the artists have not yet escaped their historical backgrounds, and feel they must still put in a reference. How far do we have to go before non-representational art is exactly non-representational art?

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