Comments on: Ceiling Painting and the Abstract Spin http://abstractcritical.com/note/ceiling-painting-and-the-abstract-spin/ Abstract Critical is a not-for profit company aiming to establish a new critical context for all generations of artists involved with ambitious abstract art. Sun, 09 Nov 2014 17:23:33 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Ben Wiedel-Kaufmann http://abstractcritical.com/note/ceiling-painting-and-the-abstract-spin/#comment-438378 Sat, 29 Mar 2014 15:06:36 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=7709#comment-438378 Robert, and others, I thought this TJ Clark essay on Veronese’s Allegories of Love might be of interest: http://www.lrb.co.uk/v36/n07/tj-clark/veroneses-allegories-of-love

]]>
By: Stig Evans http://abstractcritical.com/note/ceiling-painting-and-the-abstract-spin/#comment-333184 Wed, 11 Dec 2013 20:42:44 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=7709#comment-333184 A collector recently ran out of wall space and hung one of my paintings on her ceiling directly over her bed – she says she’s been finding it hard to get out of bed recently or the other way round, I cant remember.

]]>
By: Robin Greenwood http://abstractcritical.com/note/ceiling-painting-and-the-abstract-spin/#comment-331771 Tue, 10 Dec 2013 14:27:10 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=7709#comment-331771 Yet more goofball intellectualisation from Robert Linsley, resulting in, surprise, surprise, yet more wacko comments. Here’s mine: the only ceiling painting I’ve ever liked was the Goya dome in the Royal Chapel of St. Antonio De La Florida, Madrid. This has physicality, believability and a sure-footed and robust visual form. I absolutely hate the Tiepolo.

]]>
By: Nameer Davis http://abstractcritical.com/note/ceiling-painting-and-the-abstract-spin/#comment-331680 Tue, 10 Dec 2013 12:32:39 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=7709#comment-331680 A very important issue that has I think, been addressed significantly in a cube sculpture by Manzoni, called Base of the World, installed down under in the grounds of art gallery of New South Wales, Sydney. It’s a cube but evokes a sphere and a position on it :the cosmic, together with a certain vertiginous sense of gravity.

]]>
By: Robert Linsley http://abstractcritical.com/note/ceiling-painting-and-the-abstract-spin/#comment-326092 Thu, 05 Dec 2013 20:44:33 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=7709#comment-326092 with my pouring method I would have to make the work and then figure out how to hang it on the ceiling.

You might be right that turning a picture on the wall is not disorienting enough to replicate the kind of spatial freedom a ceiling can have, so it would be good to try ceilings. There is only one significant modern ceiling that I know of – by Braque in the Louvre. But ceilings are hard to look at.

As I mentioned, an oval or a circle has a ready-made illusion – it seems to rise in the middle and recede at the edges. So an abstract ceiling might bulge downwards rather than burst upwards – not the same illusion, but possibly a good illusion nevertheless.

Frames can aid illusionist spaces, but there are other techniques too. Under certain conditions odd formats can help, like Tiepolo’s wavy ornate convex/concave frames. Overlapping shapes (a natural technique for me) can make spaces, and then if some of those shapes also burst out of the frame there’s another illusionist kick. But all this is speculative, I’m still waiting for a chance to give it a try, and have an idea how to start.

]]>
By: Sam http://abstractcritical.com/note/ceiling-painting-and-the-abstract-spin/#comment-326016 Thu, 05 Dec 2013 19:08:36 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=7709#comment-326016 Because it directs attention to the image as something to look at, or because it allows illusion to develop? (maybe those things are quite similar to each other). Do you imagine your painting taking up a whole ceiling or a painting on canvas (or similar) hung on the ceiling?

]]>
By: Mary Fletcher http://abstractcritical.com/note/ceiling-painting-and-the-abstract-spin/#comment-325830 Thu, 05 Dec 2013 15:12:52 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=7709#comment-325830 I have often thought the ceiling is a space artists haven’t been using recently, but have not got round to doing anything about it yet.

]]>
By: Robert Linsley http://abstractcritical.com/note/ceiling-painting-and-the-abstract-spin/#comment-324909 Wed, 04 Dec 2013 21:04:35 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=7709#comment-324909 Maybe. I’d like to try. The frame plays a big role.

]]>
By: Sam http://abstractcritical.com/note/ceiling-painting-and-the-abstract-spin/#comment-324844 Wed, 04 Dec 2013 19:49:52 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=7709#comment-324844 Aren’t the problems that the physical disorientation of ceiling painting is not replicated simply by Malevich turning his canvases around (which is basically something which can only be deduced not experienced); and that if you place an abstract painting literally on the ceiling it will struggle to attain the type of illusion which is central to the Tiepelo et al’s work…?

]]>
By: Robert Linsley http://abstractcritical.com/note/ceiling-painting-and-the-abstract-spin/#comment-323658 Tue, 03 Dec 2013 19:33:36 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=note&p=7709#comment-323658 Thanks to you for reading and making a comment. I have Damisch’s book, and started it but couldn’t get through. I think it’s about clouds, another great subject, so future reading if I should live long enough to ever make a ceiling myself. This article comes from lying on the floor at the Ca’Rezzonico and staring up at a Tiepolo.

]]>