Comments on: What Paint Does http://abstractcritical.com/article/what-paint-does/ Abstract Critical is a not-for profit company aiming to establish a new critical context for all generations of artists involved with ambitious abstract art. Sun, 09 Nov 2014 17:23:33 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Marius http://abstractcritical.com/article/what-paint-does/#comment-255842 Sat, 28 Sep 2013 01:13:03 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=2925#comment-255842 I don’t think there exists any more meaningful context in which painting can be critiqued because there is no more “field” or some perceivable global progression. I think this was in some sense a subconscious goal of modernism anyway, to destroy the legitimacy of the critics and the legitimacy of painting as a “field”. Some might say “painting is dead” because of this, but this is actually a cause for celebration, because the “painting” they refer to is a rigid relic bounded by interpretations of history and certain demands of predictability. This leaves room for true art painting to flourish, without context or boundaries. In fact the only meaningful education a painter can receive today is one that destroys all his prior assumptions about painting. Even an education that tries to constructively build a painter will only end up serving as a gigantic conceptual term to be absolutely negated, therefore leading to artistic freedom.

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By: Marius http://abstractcritical.com/article/what-paint-does/#comment-255835 Sat, 28 Sep 2013 01:02:23 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=2925#comment-255835 I just stumbled upon this interesting exchange. There is a natural progress in an artist, even if he doesn’t seek it or quantify it. It’s easy to become aware of such a progression in retrospect, by looking at prior work and realize you used to “stop short.” This might not even be visible externally, but internally it’s as obvious as aging. There is obvious maturation in De Kooning’s work but he was a kind of God of chaos, always seeking to obfuscate himself, to deny the obvious impulse, and getting increasingly better at it. And I’ve always thought that his practice was related to his developing Alzheimer’s. I don’t know which caused the other but definitely related in my view.

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By: Bruce Timson http://abstractcritical.com/article/what-paint-does/#comment-163037 Sun, 19 May 2013 17:21:09 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=2925#comment-163037 Dear Andy you old rogue. I have tracked you down at last.
Please take a look at my website:
http://www.brucetimson.com
Me and Marcus are running a foundation course in Totnes, Devon, which you would be very welcome to visit.
My best wishes
Bruce

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By: Allan Howard http://abstractcritical.com/article/what-paint-does/#comment-59085 Wed, 07 Nov 2012 15:13:09 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=2925#comment-59085 In the early 50′s Heron ditched subject matter as being’problematic’. A subject dictates shapes and forms within the painting’s format which may not be ‘right ‘for the painting. He escaped to a place where he could arrange any shape within the picture freely as he wished, along with any colour.All this is pretty obvious and is a basic freedom of the abstact painter.. The cooker hob story by the way flies in the face of my comments to him about his painting ‘Scribbled Disc in Deep Cerulean’ I likened the scatter of white blobs to a necklace to get a reaction. The quick response was ‘Well,of course it isn’t a necklace’. Despite Mel Gooding’s comment on Heron’s ‘arbitrariness’,I find his work full of structure but wonderfully loose and often with oblique ‘meaning’.My wife’s remark to him that a certain painting needed a white villa in a hot climate went down very well with him.He had done the painting after swimming off Porthmeor Beach. I think that if such context finds its way into a painting in some way, if the painting in unafraid of adventurous structure, if it can relate and reflect the physical world as Heron’s Sydney paintings do, then there is enough indirect meaning in abstract art to make it valid and valuable. This approach is seemingly limitless but there are many others. To quote Peter Cook ‘To infinity and beyond’ is rather comic but has some relevance perhaps.

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By: Noela Bewry http://abstractcritical.com/article/what-paint-does/#comment-57984 Wed, 31 Oct 2012 09:12:51 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=2925#comment-57984 I was talking about Robin Greenwood’s post, I think I must have pressed the wrong button.

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By: Noela Bewry http://abstractcritical.com/article/what-paint-does/#comment-57983 Wed, 31 Oct 2012 09:11:19 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=2925#comment-57983 Only just read this post . It absolutely says it all in regard to the way artists should approach work.
Possibly the way to overcome the pressure from galleries to keep artists locked into creating more of the same saleable pieces [and the artists' need to sell work] would be to have two strands of work going on. One devoted to personal progress , the other financial.

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By: Jenni Hodgson http://abstractcritical.com/article/what-paint-does/#comment-56741 Thu, 25 Oct 2012 17:47:41 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=2925#comment-56741 Really helpful! Interesting and well-written too.

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By: Andy Cahill http://abstractcritical.com/article/what-paint-does/#comment-8593 Thu, 22 Mar 2012 07:46:48 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=2925#comment-8593 Hi Robin,
Thank you for your reply. It has been interesting to follow the comments following your essay. My reference to Granell’s paintings is that in his labour of over a year and a half on most paintings, his process is precisely “in the service of something else”.They reach far beyond presenting their own construction (inevitably lost in reproduction)and take what is simply applied and turn into something transformed.They become quite unlike what they are.They are intense and bodily.To ‘literally’explain how this happens would be to do them a great disservice.The passion that you have for abstraction is here in spades.Worth a visit.

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By: Robin Greenwood http://abstractcritical.com/article/what-paint-does/#comment-8537 Tue, 20 Mar 2012 13:33:50 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=2925#comment-8537 Andy,
I haven’t seen Granell’s paintings, but from reproductions they look exactly the sort of literal demonstrations of materiality that I criticise in my essay. Do you have a counter-argument? Or tell us why you think they are extraordinary.

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By: Andy Cahill http://abstractcritical.com/article/what-paint-does/#comment-8495 Mon, 19 Mar 2012 08:49:01 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=2925#comment-8495 If you want to know ‘what paint does’there are three paintings and one drawing in a group show at the newly opened Red Space gallery in Clerkenwell by Simón Granell which are quite simply extraordinary.

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