Comments on: Twombly and Motherwell – Painting, Prints, Photographs and High Culture http://abstractcritical.com/article/twombly-and-motherwell-painting-prints-photographs-and-high-culture/ Abstract Critical is a not-for profit company aiming to establish a new critical context for all generations of artists involved with ambitious abstract art. Sun, 09 Nov 2014 17:23:33 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Sam Cornish http://abstractcritical.com/article/twombly-and-motherwell-painting-prints-photographs-and-high-culture/#comment-55011 Tue, 09 Oct 2012 16:09:31 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6175#comment-55011 I’d say ‘obviously do not possess’ rather than ‘do not obviously possess’. Perhaps the problem is not seeing past them as luxury items but seeing past the rhetoric that has built up around around Twombly? Though I also sort of think that if we need to put so much effort into finding a way to look at them, they may not be worth looking at in the first place.

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By: Luke Elwes http://abstractcritical.com/article/twombly-and-motherwell-painting-prints-photographs-and-high-culture/#comment-54982 Tue, 09 Oct 2012 12:09:35 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6175#comment-54982 It was not clear to me, and perhaps someone knows, if Twombly’s photographic work is contiguous with the paintings – the product of reflection or studio ‘down time’ – or a tasteful afterthought. Are they integral to the process or just expensive souvenirs? There is unfortunately no clue to their genesis in the catalogue (itself an expensive souvenir).

Uniformly presented by Gagosian as luxury tokens, it is hard to differentiate those which simply revisit his paintings by other means from those which fleetingly reveal the eye behind the camera: perhaps most strikingly in the less designed and more humble shots of trees in Lexington, where the eyes of the old artist simply register dark shapes of foliage drifting in pale skies. They appear as fragments in the drift of days, in which his/our judgement abates. To call them ‘thing-poems’ (in a Keatsian vein), as Edmund De Waal does in the catalogue, is to give them a weight and substance they do not obviously possess – perhaps to see them (the last ones at least) as the trace of an unmediated eye at work might be more helpful. Even Motherwell, if he were here, might have appreciated their ‘zen’ sensibility.

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By: Sam Cornish http://abstractcritical.com/article/twombly-and-motherwell-painting-prints-photographs-and-high-culture/#comment-54238 Sat, 29 Sep 2012 07:43:36 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6175#comment-54238 One of the striking things about Twombly is the lack of any real sense of scale. Motherwell works his smaller pieces through a number of different stages so that they fit on the larger scale of his full paintings; Twombly just seems to make his marks bigger. Though I agree with John’s characterisation of Twombly as a stylist this certainly fits with David Sweet’s image of him as a ‘Para-painter’: I don’t think the two ideas necessarily contradict each other.

In the paintings at Gagosian there was a very odd (and momentarily intriguing) sensation that the rectangle of the canvas was an image taken from a view finder, that was zooming in and out and capturing different views of a unitary (infinite?) field of loops that were all the same size.

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By: Robert Linsley http://abstractcritical.com/article/twombly-and-motherwell-painting-prints-photographs-and-high-culture/#comment-54200 Fri, 28 Sep 2012 12:19:28 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6175#comment-54200 I agree completely.

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