Comments on: The Show is Over at Gagosian http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-show-is-over-at-gagosian/ Abstract Critical is a not-for profit company aiming to establish a new critical context for all generations of artists involved with ambitious abstract art. Sun, 09 Nov 2014 17:23:33 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: John Link http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-show-is-over-at-gagosian/#comment-344544 Sun, 22 Dec 2013 02:41:59 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7675#comment-344544 I don’t know the date for END, but Ed Ruscha was not alive in 1933.

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By: Dan Coombs http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-show-is-over-at-gagosian/#comment-322368 Mon, 02 Dec 2013 19:00:25 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7675#comment-322368 “I should like to be the landscape which I am contemplating, I should like this sky, this quiet water to think themselves within me, that it might be I whom they express in flesh and bone, and I remain at a distance. But it is also by this distance that the sky and the water exist before me. My contemplation is an excruciation only because it is also a joy. I can not appropriate the snow field where I slide. It remains foreign, forbidden, but I take delight in this very effort toward an impossible possession. I experience it as a triumph, not as a defeat.”

Simone de Beauvoir, The Ethics of Ambiguity

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By: Pete Hoida http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-show-is-over-at-gagosian/#comment-318009 Fri, 29 Nov 2013 09:34:35 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7675#comment-318009 Couldn’t agree more………
You could add the Berthe Morisot at Richard Green, that makes three. To get some measure of the achievements of the artists at Onnasch you might compare those with what was going on in the UK at that time, Davie, Hilton, Heron, Frost and others too. Despite that there is a good Louis at Sprueth Magers, the large one best of the two filling the huge canvas with a nice quality to the texture and colour. I’m surprised no-one has mentioned the Paul Klee, beautiful little pictures that have a large impact. And he nearly always gets it right…..

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By: Robin Greenwood http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-show-is-over-at-gagosian/#comment-317330 Thu, 28 Nov 2013 21:41:05 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7675#comment-317330 Dan,
Despite appearing to be another supporter of the ambiguity army (you go looking for it!), what you have eloquently written here on the de Kooning made it sound so significant that you persuaded me to traipse over to Gargantuan for a look.

“…de Kooning’s paintings fold back in on themselves – figure turns back into ground and then ground, suddenly circumnavigated, turns back into figure. This continual exchange between a body and the negative space that defines it, which oscillate in a kind of perpetual ambiguity, makes de Kooning’s paintings both spatially deep and immediate.”

That could be really good, if it were true. It might even prove the case for a “good” kind of ambiguity. But despite the pentimenti I had no trouble at all in reading it as rather banal drawing on a white background, and pretty poor drawing at that, not really signifying any remarkable activity or spatial articulation; it’s vague, indeterminate, ambiguously figurative, which is the only way you can “read” space into it – decidedly not good. I think you are (like Paul Corio) over-romanticising late de Kooning; if you are seeing lots of spatial stuff happening here, you are seeing “pictures in the fire”, because De Kooning is certainly not building it in. But then, if you’re out looking for “psychic” stuff, you’re gonna see all sorts.

As for the rest of the exhibition – oh dear, what a sad and sorry lot. The de Kooning aside, there is hardly a single painting worth the name. If this show “…represents a particular history of American painting…” it’s one we should forget about as quickly as possible. It is 100% very bad conceptual stuff masquerading as painting to make it seem like art. Once I’d done the de Kooning, I couldn’t wait to get out. I went straight back across town to the Onnasch Collection, which by comparison looked great – for half a minute or so. Sorry Patrick, but it really doesn’t stand up to longer scrutiny. I had to dash off again to find something I could look at for, ooh, all of five minutes together without getting bored or putting my fist through something…

I found little Boudin and Ruisdael paintings over at Richard Green Gallery. Both brilliant! How can you claim “Illusionism in painting has always depended upon the presentation of something apparently graspable which turns out to be actually absent; representation in this sense, always prefigures a loss”? Not so; no sense of loss here, only something new made real and truly gained.

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By: Robin Greenwood http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-show-is-over-at-gagosian/#comment-314012 Tue, 26 Nov 2013 13:57:14 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7675#comment-314012 “…another trait of the artist”?!? Would that be the “great” artist or the childlike innocent one? One of the great “naives” perhaps, like Titian, Goya, Poussin, Constable, Cezanne etc. The fools…

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By: Robert Linsley http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-show-is-over-at-gagosian/#comment-313938 Tue, 26 Nov 2013 13:02:26 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7675#comment-313938 Indeed, what is wrong with contradiction? I think the ability to sustain a contradiction without trying to resolve it is another trait of the artist.

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By: Elizabeth http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-show-is-over-at-gagosian/#comment-313673 Tue, 26 Nov 2013 09:14:51 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7675#comment-313673 What’s wrong with ambiguity and contradiction?

I believe the best artists do possess a childlike innocence and spontaneity (naivety) that plays an integral part in their work.

Enjoy Abstract Critical immensely. Thank you.

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By: Robert Linsley http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-show-is-over-at-gagosian/#comment-306391 Tue, 19 Nov 2013 20:19:18 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7675#comment-306391 thank you, although I’m not so naive as not to sense an irony.

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By: Robin Greenwood http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-show-is-over-at-gagosian/#comment-306372 Tue, 19 Nov 2013 19:40:32 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7675#comment-306372 I’ve just had a look at your balls and they look quite naive.

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By: Robert Linsley http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-show-is-over-at-gagosian/#comment-306198 Tue, 19 Nov 2013 15:25:52 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7675#comment-306198 let’s start by saying that a naive person is one who blurts out what’s in his or her mind without calculating the consequences – I find it an endearing trait, many don’t, but you would certainly qualify, and it’s a pre-requisite for genuine art. To act spontaneously without calculating the reaction of others. A great artist is quite capable of calculating those reactions, and might even think they are doing so, but their naivety breaks though anyway with unexpected results.

I hate always referring to my blog, but I made a post about this recently, and note that Schoenberg, as an exemplary naive artist, is also supremely conscious of what he is doing.
http://newabstraction.net/2013/10/14/artist-of-the-naive-type/

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