Comments on: The Manet Lesson: Subjectivity and the ultra-foreground http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-manet-lesson-subjectivity-and-the-ultra-foreground/ Abstract Critical is a not-for profit company aiming to establish a new critical context for all generations of artists involved with ambitious abstract art. Sun, 09 Nov 2014 17:23:33 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Robert Linsley http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-manet-lesson-subjectivity-and-the-ultra-foreground/#comment-178740 Sat, 15 Jun 2013 10:12:25 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7059#comment-178740 I think that David’s ideas about foreground apply mostly, and most interestingly, to painting.

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By: Tim Scott http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-manet-lesson-subjectivity-and-the-ultra-foreground/#comment-177721 Thu, 13 Jun 2013 13:24:40 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7059#comment-177721 Leaving aside David Sweet’s philosophico/aesthetic analysis of Caro’s sixties abstraction, there is one crucial factor that he has ignored. If Caro had not encountered, at the time, the Smith/construction/STEEL idea, the forms of ‘Early one Morning’ and ‘Prairie’ could not have existed. ‘Dejeuner sur l’Herbe’ and ‘Demoiselles d’Avignon’ are made in much the same way; ‘Torse d’Adele’ and ‘Prairie’ are not. Sweet’s interesting ideas about foreground, background and still life are wisdom in retrospect; sculptors just don’t think like that; their concerns are this stuff in front of them, and what on earth to do with it until inspiration strikes. Of course there will be a history behind them, but it is making the history that counts. Caro’s sixties abstraction is revolutionary not because he knew what he was doing, but simply because he was following his nose – but what a nose !

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By: Tim Scott http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-manet-lesson-subjectivity-and-the-ultra-foreground/#comment-177547 Thu, 13 Jun 2013 06:54:20 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7059#comment-177547 Leaving aside David Sweet’s philosophico/aesthetic analysis of Caro’s sixties abstraction; he has missed one crucial factor. Had Caro not encountered Smith/construction/STEEL when he did, the forms of ‘Early One Morning’ or ‘Prairie’ simply could not have existed. ‘Demoiselles d’Avignon’ and ‘Dejeuner sur l’Herbe’were made in much the same way; ‘Torse d’Adele’ and Prairie were not. It needed Picasso’s intervention with ‘construction’ to lay a path for Caro. Speculations on spatial play; foreground, background and so on, are wisdom in retrospect. The fact is that sculptors are not thinking like that when they do it.They may have all the intellectual challenges in the world in front of them, but at the moment of action they have to battle with what they can physically do with the stuff in front of them. I do think,however, that David Sweet’s point about still life is a very interesting one; and of course we then come back to Picasso and his subjects for ‘collage’and ‘comstruction’.

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By: Robert Linsley http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-manet-lesson-subjectivity-and-the-ultra-foreground/#comment-177397 Wed, 12 Jun 2013 23:44:59 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7059#comment-177397 Interesting take on a problem (maybe the wrong word) that’s still alive in abstraction today. I’ve always liked Caro and thought I knew why, but your reading defeats me somewhat. It’s a little too theoretical or something like that. My first instinct is to say that the unintelligible is attractive in itself, so if modernist art has become unintelligible then it has acquired a new life. I also wonder if those who don’t get it today maybe never did. They’ve had their say for some time now, at first claiming that their world was left out of abstraction, playing the victim in other words, nowadays entrenched. Abstraction still stands for what it is.

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