Comments on: The Abstract-ness of Poussin http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-abstract-ness-of-poussin/ Abstract Critical is a not-for profit company aiming to establish a new critical context for all generations of artists involved with ambitious abstract art. Sun, 09 Nov 2014 17:23:33 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: anthony seymour http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-abstract-ness-of-poussin/#comment-9396 Thu, 12 Apr 2012 17:41:56 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=1439#comment-9396 I agree with Robin about the display at Dulwich!
However, the last sculpture in the mausoleum was far more interesting as a sort of “unknown masterpiece” concerning the human mind and the development of modern human consciousness!
It was a pity none of the Bacchus paintings from 2005 were included at Dulwich, because they seem to have succeeded in going under the radar of contemporary fashionable deceptions to say something as direct and most visceral history paintings!

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By: GB http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-abstract-ness-of-poussin/#comment-605 Sun, 17 Jul 2011 13:41:59 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=1439#comment-605 It seems that Cy Twombly’s juxtoposition with Poussin has caused Robin Greenwood to be filled with ire and spit. His fellow commentators seem to agree with his assessment.

This seems to me to be a good reason for a small comment of my own. Robin seems troubled with the painterly context of Twombly and the historical painting of Poussin. It seems obvious to me that there is a relationship between Poussin and Twombly’s ambition to develop painterly language.

I realise Twombly is not an inside artist who has followed a particular trend and this has led him to become regarded as parochial in some circles. However one crtitcism that seems irrelevant is literalness, he was not a mechanical painter. Robins critique in this area feels more like a reflection on his understanding of how and why to create a work of art. Especially when assessed using the dialogue prevalent in todays highly referenced artworld.

Familiarity and gesture are not buzzwords that inform critial debate because today they are irrelevant to the idea of a work of art. Twombly’s is the individual language of paint and should be seen in this context and not orientated and critiqued as if part of the clever arid idea, usually completely frigid and banal in its final outcome. The painterly narrative that informs Poussin and others including Rothko and Van Gogh is resident in his works and this is more than can be said for the collaborative whole that makes up the product driven art world today. Twombly’s paintings are not moribound reflections or swayed narratives determined by trends in painting. Take them or leave them is his message.

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By: Spacey http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-abstract-ness-of-poussin/#comment-586 Fri, 15 Jul 2011 11:05:44 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=1439#comment-586 Is this a reminder of the importance of the artist’s physical timing of the moment when ‘newly arranging’ sensual subjects in a more metaphysical light ?

Agreed the exhibition highlights how movement is a problem for Poussin. But the possibilities of what might emerge from any Poussin painting are infinitely more moving and inviting than the sense of post-climactic dissipation that emanates from many Twombly paintings and leads to disappointment in anything much existing beyond it( and to Strictly’s hope that this might change in an upside down viewing ?).

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By: Strictly http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-abstract-ness-of-poussin/#comment-582 Thu, 14 Jul 2011 13:21:40 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=1439#comment-582 Apologies for error in post from Strictly on July 14th. For Tate Britain please read Tate Modern. Thanks.

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By: Strictly http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-abstract-ness-of-poussin/#comment-581 Thu, 14 Jul 2011 11:44:25 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=1439#comment-581 Another highly entertaining, bare-knuckled piece of analysis from Robin Greenwood. His ‘victims’ on this occasion, the work of Cy Twombly and the curatorial judgement/skills of Nicholas Cullinan would appear (not, I admit, having yet seen the exhibition) to have been foolhardy opponents for this heavy-weight conscience of the abstract, we can therefore have little sympathy for either. That said, and at the risk of receiving a brutal right hook from the doughty Mr Greenwood, if I had to choose between a Poussin and a Twombly to hang on my wall I would probably opt for a Twombly. One of those nice red drippy ones currently on show at Tate Modern, but I would hang it upside-down. Anyone for ketchup?

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By: littletinter http://abstractcritical.com/article/the-abstract-ness-of-poussin/#comment-577 Wed, 13 Jul 2011 21:49:34 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=1439#comment-577 Don Judd’s 1964 comment on Cy Twombly’s painting – “goofy whimsy”.

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