Comments on: Some thoughts on Grids http://abstractcritical.com/article/some-thoughts-on-grids/ Abstract Critical is a not-for profit company aiming to establish a new critical context for all generations of artists involved with ambitious abstract art. Sun, 09 Nov 2014 17:23:33 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Scott http://abstractcritical.com/article/some-thoughts-on-grids/#comment-104450 Thu, 14 Feb 2013 19:40:51 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=4349#comment-104450 I think the reality of life includes a sense of order as well as tragedy and chaos. Grids lead me to think about the macro/micro levels of existence. We’re all composed of cells, for example. We’re all individual humans. We’re all generally one nationality, etc. Same thing with time, or music. It’s all measured out into units. And within the confines of that order there are all sorts of variations. When I see a grid laid out before me, I can process on a macro level, while simultaneously registering the variations of each unit one from the next.

A grid of colors, such as G. Richter’s cathedral windows, presents a sense of possibility, randomness, and the infinite.

]]>
By: Kim Matthews http://abstractcritical.com/article/some-thoughts-on-grids/#comment-54262 Sat, 29 Sep 2012 22:44:08 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=4349#comment-54262 It’s funny but I feel the same way about trees as some of you seem to feel about grids, and it all seems pretty arbitrary to me. You could make the same sort of implication that people who do representational work rely on the comfort of the familiar. And equally arbitrary is the claim that spontaneity is heroic. In the end, it’s what you get that matters: grid, tree, splatter. No one strategy is inherently superior to the other. What is laudible is honesty, devotion to craft however you define it, and the courage to make the work your mind, heart, and/or soul needs to make.

]]>
By: jenny meehan http://abstractcritical.com/article/some-thoughts-on-grids/#comment-53168 Thu, 06 Sep 2012 10:19:20 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=4349#comment-53168 Yes, indeed. Painters are always moved unconsciously by the beauty of lines and colours…their mutal relationships enchant, and are of more interest than what they might represent. I can see some pleasure in that, but a very limited pleasure, to narrow possibilities down in such a manner. Each to their own.

I have been thinking recently about equilibrium in painting composition and this relates to a sense of control and order, which is a kind of stable feeling, and then toying with the reality of life which always includes a sense of tragedy,(brokenness) and I think this might be the cause of my own dissatisfaction with paintings which cling so intimately with the grid. The grid as a tool is one thing and I found Danila’s use of it very interesting, though I have no wish to remove my self from my own painting in that way, I can see the interest and how this could be a very fruitful and interesting process.

]]>
By: Anthony Jones http://abstractcritical.com/article/some-thoughts-on-grids/#comment-53158 Thu, 06 Sep 2012 05:00:39 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=4349#comment-53158 I have used grids in one way or another for over 40 years, the Romans et al used grids for much longer! but in general I have come to realise that they are an effective way of organising visual information.

I was a typographic designer for 20 years, opted out and did a fine art degree, since then I have been somewhat ‘short of funds’… but the use of ‘the grid’ is always there.

For some reason I reponded to the role it has played and still continues to play…. I use it and it uses me…

]]>
By: Alan Fowler http://abstractcritical.com/article/some-thoughts-on-grids/#comment-11512 Sat, 05 May 2012 11:10:17 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=4349#comment-11512 The use of a grid as an integral and overt element of an image is often referred to as a relatively modern practice. Interesting, therefore, that its first use by a British artist was by David Bomberg in his two extraordinary paintings of 1913/14 – In the Hold and Ju Jitsu.

]]>
By: jenny meehan http://abstractcritical.com/article/some-thoughts-on-grids/#comment-10659 Sun, 29 Apr 2012 21:58:39 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=4349#comment-10659 Apologies to those who love grids, but I find them really boring. They can be very clever, so I am sometimes very impressed, but I don’t get a thrill. G R I D. AAAhhh! Even the word strikes horror! (I jest, of course!)

]]>
By: Danila Rumold http://abstractcritical.com/article/some-thoughts-on-grids/#comment-9653 Fri, 20 Apr 2012 15:08:46 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=4349#comment-9653 The thing I have picked up from this conversation is whether the grid is a form of conventional constraint or, a structure providing liberation. In my own work, I move back and forth between making drawings from my paintings and then paintings from my drawings. By using the grid as a squaring tool, it allows me to meditate on the relationship of each square thereby slowing me down. Through this process of careful looking, it allows me to empty the work of “Self” and move into the unknown. Arriving at this new way of Seeing (outside of my own subjectivity) demands my presence and beckons the necessity of being Awake.

]]>
By: Robert Linsley http://abstractcritical.com/article/some-thoughts-on-grids/#comment-9574 Wed, 18 Apr 2012 15:22:49 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=4349#comment-9574 Sam, I agree that each work is a specific distinct thing, with its own particulars, but the “grid” as a concept or as a mathematical form precedes any of its applications. That’s the problem, for me, and that’s what I meant. But I’m not doctrinaire. Implied grids in Cezanne are very beautiful. There are pleasures to be found in Mondrian, etc.

But to pick up on Deirdre’s remarks, the standard progression from cubism to Mondrian to “flatness” to monochromes is only one possible path. It’s hard to do something new in abstraction, but it is possible.

]]>
By: Sam Cornish http://abstractcritical.com/article/some-thoughts-on-grids/#comment-9560 Wed, 18 Apr 2012 07:08:14 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=4349#comment-9560 Whilst I agree with you Robert that it may be a positive thing for artists to move beyond ‘an unconscious reflection of their environment’, I do want to question whether ‘all grids are really the same grid’. Leaving aside questions of reference (and keeping within formal organisation) do you really think clearly and directly stated grid in a Mondrian really the same as the grid in a Matisse, or the grid in the painting by Poussin you discuss on your blog?

]]>
By: Robin Greenwood http://abstractcritical.com/article/some-thoughts-on-grids/#comment-9449 Sat, 14 Apr 2012 11:34:22 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=4349#comment-9449 I recommend the excellent post on Robert Linsley’s blog at http://newabstraction.net/2011/11/21/stately-verticals/
about verticals and horizontals in a Poussin painting, and how they open up the space rather than flatten it. Are grids a constraint or a liberation? I guess these things go in phases, and my sense at the moment is that geometry, symmetry, grids and suchlike have been done to death in recent times. Take a look at the Hirst show at Tate – just about everything in this show is conventionally and boringly arranged symmetrically on grids or in boxes. It’s a safe bet, isn’t it? My inclination is to get as far from this as I can, and at the risk of falling down, attempt something with more freedom to it. Like Robert, I want to arrive at the unknown; and, what’s more, I want to do it in an unpremeditated manner.

]]>