Comments on: Seen In New York, January 2014 http://abstractcritical.com/article/seen-in-new-york-january-2014/ Abstract Critical is a not-for profit company aiming to establish a new critical context for all generations of artists involved with ambitious abstract art. Sun, 09 Nov 2014 17:23:33 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Graham Peacock http://abstractcritical.com/article/seen-in-new-york-january-2014/#comment-394915 Thu, 20 Feb 2014 13:58:09 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7857#comment-394915 Ms Farugee’s earlier works show a very conservative, all be it academic approach to patterning . Her recent work illustrated here has a more adventurousness approach which does echoe quite closely the early 1980′s works of the Candain painter Joseph Drapell ,(1943- ). What Mr Greenwood thinks of Mr Drapell’s work does nothing to address the fact that Fargee’s current work is lacking in its originality, even though it shows much progress.

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By: Robin Greenwood http://abstractcritical.com/article/seen-in-new-york-january-2014/#comment-394362 Wed, 19 Feb 2014 19:04:59 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7857#comment-394362 Moffett, Wilkin and Carpenter are very seriously wrong about this guy Drapell – he’s so bad he makes me want to support the New Casualist Provisional DIYers.

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By: Lucy Baker http://abstractcritical.com/article/seen-in-new-york-january-2014/#comment-394338 Wed, 19 Feb 2014 18:18:23 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7857#comment-394338 That isn’t quite so bad , as Anoka’s which are much too similar , nearly copies! At least Scott Cumberland is doing something of his own!

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By: Lucy Baker http://abstractcritical.com/article/seen-in-new-york-january-2014/#comment-394336 Wed, 19 Feb 2014 18:16:04 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7857#comment-394336 Ty Robert! You are so right! I am appalled at Ms Anoka’s shameless show of copying Drapell’s work! You can also find more of his work on The New New Painters on Wiki and The New New Painters on Facebook (I am one of the NNP and I have exhibited with Joe for , well decades! Since about 1978 or so ! Ken Moffett exhibited one of his earliest a Red painting at The Federal Reserve Bank of Boston and at Andre’s Emmerich’s Gallery back in the 70′s !! “Curator’s Choice” (catalog available , through me! )

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By: Lucy Baker http://abstractcritical.com/article/seen-in-new-york-january-2014/#comment-394328 Wed, 19 Feb 2014 18:09:12 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7857#comment-394328 If Anoka Farugee isn’t a student or folower of Joseph Drapell, this borders dangerously on plagerism (copyright laws). I have never seen anyone copy Joe’s work soooo closely! I think it would be most advisable to find her own style. Joe might be flattered or not (I cannot say , but I will certainly ask him!) ,but he’s been painting in this style(his!) for now as long as I have known him! He started in roughly 1977-78!! And I hope she gives him full credit as he is the master of his own style!

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By: Robin Greenwood http://abstractcritical.com/article/seen-in-new-york-january-2014/#comment-392430 Sun, 16 Feb 2014 16:48:04 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7857#comment-392430 Glad we got the “compact” version, Brent. Anything longer may have resulted in permanent psychic injury to all concerned.

Kind regards and best wishes.

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By: Brent Hallard http://abstractcritical.com/article/seen-in-new-york-january-2014/#comment-392130 Sun, 16 Feb 2014 02:55:11 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7857#comment-392130 oh dear Robin, the compact interview with Daniel is not ‘breathtakingly false’, but alarming…
as it has set you off, which is very good!

Very best regards, enjoy your writings, to which I have no complaint.

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By: Robin Greenwood http://abstractcritical.com/article/seen-in-new-york-january-2014/#comment-390637 Thu, 13 Feb 2014 18:56:15 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7857#comment-390637 Thanks for that Paul, an interesting link with Turner, who we are discussing on the other feed. I respect your seeing so much in them, but, compared with good painting like Turner’s, they still sound so much of a nuance of a nuance. I suppose I’m very resistant to the “less is more” thing, and get very agitated when the accompanying text/interpretation gets as pretentious as the one Levine himself gives. If all they are is little nuances about shades of white, and they feel poetic to you, well, OK. I’ll pass. I want to see a considerable amount more ambitious momentum in abstract art. And I don’t, at the end of the day, believe in a “language” of abstraction, especially if it legitimises banality.

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By: Paul Corio http://abstractcritical.com/article/seen-in-new-york-january-2014/#comment-390514 Thu, 13 Feb 2014 14:50:50 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7857#comment-390514 In the main body of my piece I talk briefly about what I responded to in the Levine monochromes – just to add to that:

I don’t think they these are conceptual in character, because they had a surprising amount of space and light – all had a small but discernible value range, moving from white to off white (sometimes towards grey, sometimes yellow, sometimes ochre) and the subtle shift made them glow – think of the way that Turner modulated from lead white to naples yellow in some of his depictions of the sky. This was intensified by the framing canvas color, itself light but invariably darker than the paint. The surfaces were built up, quick thickly on some, but because of the light colored paint they don’t have that heavy impasto feel (which I rarely enjoy). The topography lent a kind of Hoffman-esque push and pull between physical application and subtle illusionism. In the end I found them quite poetic, and essentially all of those key features, along with the scale, had to be seen in person, they really don’t survive the internet at all.

I guess I don’t agree that the monochrome – or any motif or approach – is redundant or discredited, it all depends on what the individual artist does with it. Western painters got several centuries of solid painting out of madonnas and crucifixions. The lousy examples (of which there were many) proved nothing about the validity of the primary motive. I think the same holds true for the language of abstraction.

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By: Robin Greenwood http://abstractcritical.com/article/seen-in-new-york-january-2014/#comment-390492 Thu, 13 Feb 2014 13:58:25 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7857#comment-390492 Paul,
Since you are the one who has seen them, maybe you could critique them. What’s going on in their favour?

I admit, my very strong inclination is indeed to dismiss the whole endeavour out-of-hand, since I consider it to be already discredited – or at the very least redundant.

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