Comments on: Richard Diebenkorn: A Door Opened http://abstractcritical.com/article/richard-diebenkorn-a-door-opened/ Abstract Critical is a not-for profit company aiming to establish a new critical context for all generations of artists involved with ambitious abstract art. Sun, 09 Nov 2014 17:23:33 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Timothy Daniels http://abstractcritical.com/article/richard-diebenkorn-a-door-opened/#comment-291407 Wed, 06 Nov 2013 23:25:08 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6144#comment-291407 This is a marvellous article. I was fortunate enough to see the show in Fort Worth and was struck by the flat-out beauty of it. I’m planning to get to the Berkley show later this winter. This article will be essential reading prior to that experience.

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By: Dean Taylor Drewyer http://abstractcritical.com/article/richard-diebenkorn-a-door-opened/#comment-73006 Wed, 26 Dec 2012 23:01:10 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6144#comment-73006 One needs to consider RD’s Berkley paintings as the early context out od which the figurative and Ocean Park paintings came. Diebenkorn never felt he’d completely left abstraction behind, he rather felt a fatigue with ‘getting charged up for each painting’, so a kind of spatial examination and careful restatement of issues began. He later said the figures disappeared because they were too dominant. His smaller scale still-life and studio scenes are strong connectors between the Berkley’s and the Ocean Parks and make more clear the strengths of all three.

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By: Jessica Snow http://abstractcritical.com/article/richard-diebenkorn-a-door-opened/#comment-53975 Mon, 24 Sep 2012 18:15:19 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6144#comment-53975 Thank you for your observations on Diebenkorn! I think of his pentimenti as the bones of the painting, that which gives it structure. These lines feel so uncalculated in his work, as though just meant to be, marking a previous state the way a line of foam on the beach will mark the changing tide. And his work holds that paradox, just as you say, of being structured and geometric yet holding those shifts of tide, sunlight, the obscuring effects of fog and the idiosyncrasies of perception..

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By: Sam Cornish http://abstractcritical.com/article/richard-diebenkorn-a-door-opened/#comment-53940 Mon, 24 Sep 2012 07:59:07 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6144#comment-53940 Just to point that Ashley West is a ‘he’ and was a young painter in the seventies…

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By: Nancy Natale http://abstractcritical.com/article/richard-diebenkorn-a-door-opened/#comment-53883 Sun, 23 Sep 2012 04:33:21 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6144#comment-53883 Beautifully written and expressed. I enjoyed reading your exposition of the paintings and about your intense engagement with them. I wasn’t able to see the show at the Corcoran and I regret that because I probably won’t be able to see such an extensive show again near the East Coast USA. I’m glad you were able to spend time with the work that meant so much to you.

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By: peg bachenheimer http://abstractcritical.com/article/richard-diebenkorn-a-door-opened/#comment-53839 Sat, 22 Sep 2012 02:41:30 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6144#comment-53839 Very interesting observations and thought process. These paintings are some of my favorites and I loved reading about how a young painter sees them in relation to her work. Thank you for writing this and sharing your ideas and feelings.

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By: David Sweet http://abstractcritical.com/article/richard-diebenkorn-a-door-opened/#comment-53835 Fri, 21 Sep 2012 22:34:21 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6144#comment-53835 It’s interesting to read an enthusiastic, young person’s account of Diebenkorn’s post 1967 paintings. Following the theme of educational recollection, I remember, as a student, being very impressed by his Woman in Profile (1958) in the Dunn International Exhibition at the Tate in 1963. (There’s a little video of a Pathé News visit to the show in which the painting can be glimpsed. http://www.britishpathe.com/dunn-international-art-at-tate-gallery)

I met Diebenkorn when he visited Paris the following year. In those days, the work he was best known for was expressly figurative, i.e. it contained figures. When you were a student in the sixties you had to make figure paintings as part of your Diploma examination, so it was inspiring to see someone using them in a forceful way.

In comparison, the Ocean Park series was a bit of a let down. He appeared to take a short cut to abstraction merely by excluding the figures, leaving the Bay Area architecture and landscape structures behind, but in a rather feeble condition. With those paintings Diebenkorn seemed to pass through a taste barrier, from risky to safe, and ended up relying too much on luminosity and a certain studied iffy-ness in the drawing. In his attempt to find a winning formula, he may have been too influenced by Matisse’s Window at Collioure (1914), or the Notré-Dame picture. My guess is he probably saw these on his Paris visit in November 1964, as well as in the big 1966 Matisse show in Los Angeles.

His non-figurative paintings are OK, but just not as good as his figurative stuff.

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By: Jonathan Beer http://abstractcritical.com/article/richard-diebenkorn-a-door-opened/#comment-53744 Wed, 19 Sep 2012 22:14:43 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6144#comment-53744 A fantastic article on Diebenkorn – Loved the relation of his paintings to the architectural distribution of force with structure.

http://www.JonathanBeer.com

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