Comments on: Painting after Cyrus http://abstractcritical.com/article/painting-after-cyrus/ Abstract Critical is a not-for profit company aiming to establish a new critical context for all generations of artists involved with ambitious abstract art. Sun, 09 Nov 2014 17:23:33 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Peter Stott http://abstractcritical.com/article/painting-after-cyrus/#comment-125081 Wed, 20 Mar 2013 23:38:13 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6685#comment-125081 The purely visual, by its very nature is a 2D data set, flatness assumes a complete 2D data set, outside of the problematic nature of an image and its ‘thickness’.

The digital image is pure information, it is conceptual, it doesn’t have any thickness at all, in that sense it could be seen to be the most purely visual, hence the allure of the screen, as a display of pure visual information.

However, it is open to conjecture as to whether the visual field of the viewer is more visual here than there, abstract painting is alive and well because whether something has more or less information to it, it is still an interesting, mysterious enigma, in that sense Cyrus failed, because abstract painting is a recognized as-yet not fully understood phenomenon.

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By: John Bunker http://abstractcritical.com/article/painting-after-cyrus/#comment-122780 Sat, 16 Mar 2013 23:49:48 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6685#comment-122780 Hear, hearTerry! I’m all for being humbled and rumbled (!) by great art. I also like the idea of being part (no matter how small) of a progressive story.

So rather than talk about myths, romanticism and doomed love maybe we should focus on the realities of making abstract paintings now in the ‘expanded field ‘?Painting and painting abstractly is just one choice amongst many on offer to the artist. How has this positively affected abstract painting?How do you keep the painterly ‘ball in the air’ so to speak? I have actively sought out older artists who have remained committed to abstract painting and sculpture throughout this period (70s onwards) to find out how they have challenged themselves and others in the process of developing their work. Due to their generosity of spirit I have learnt a lot. But dialogues like these are difficult to maintain in terms of face to face communication because of time commitments and the energy required by all concerned. I hope AbCrit remains a site that keeps the channels open for real and positive cross-generational dialogue. Is this not a vital part of that idea of the progressive story?

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By: Terry Ryall http://abstractcritical.com/article/painting-after-cyrus/#comment-122674 Sat, 16 Mar 2013 13:32:51 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6685#comment-122674 Sam, If you are correct in your assessment that the ‘truly visual’ is an unreachable aspiration and a ‘noble ideal’ then the inference is that abstract artists are willingly involved in a sort of 21st century version of the quest for the Holy Grail-indeed the stuff of mythology. This scenario would seem to add credence to the characterising of many contributors to this website as willing participants in a ‘romantic project’ which is doomed to failure (and by inference as indivuals who are intentionally bathing in something akin to the bitter-sweet waters of unrequitable love) rather than artists who wish to play a part,no matter how humble,in the progressive story of abstract art.
I want no part of any underlying impulses, however noble, that contain no possibility of success or achievement. Noble-failure is so over-rated don’t you think? To indulge in myths and goals that are unreachable is really only affording oneself a licence to fail and we have to believe that it is possible to make successful art that is ‘truly visual’ in the terms that you describe in your first paragraph. Otherwise we might all just as well dump our materials in the nearest fast-flowing river and lose ourselves like unfortunate refugees in other disciplines such as performance art which we are invited by David Sweet to contemplate as possibly being classifiable as ‘painting’! You cannot be serious man!

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By: John Bunker http://abstractcritical.com/article/painting-after-cyrus/#comment-122029 Fri, 15 Mar 2013 12:34:28 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6685#comment-122029 I think the process of getting MORE abstract artists nvolved in debates like this is the way forward.

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By: john holland http://abstractcritical.com/article/painting-after-cyrus/#comment-122028 Fri, 15 Mar 2013 12:33:24 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6685#comment-122028 Sam- I think ‘visual’ shouldn’t be confused with the purely optical, which is a scientific notion that of course doesn’t correspond to the way we look at a picture.
Associations and analogies are inevitable, they are part of how we see,and withoutthem, every painting would be the first painting. But some things are more ‘timeless’ than others- there’s plenty of now obscure symbolism in much Old Master art that’s now either invisible or irrelevant to us, but the more essentially ‘visual’ part remains.
I can’t think of many Modernist artist who believed in a ‘pure’ visuality- many enveloped their work in psychological, metaphorical or political mythologies. Nevertheless, these ‘contents’, for want of a better word, were grounded in what we saw- unlike much Victorian art, and a lot of art today.

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By: Robin Greenwood http://abstractcritical.com/article/painting-after-cyrus/#comment-122009 Fri, 15 Mar 2013 11:20:31 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6685#comment-122009 We have plenty of people making abstract art – look at all those mythical Provisional Painters over the pond. Numbers are not the problem, are they? Quality is the problem – how to make better abstract art. Maybe we’d be better off with fewer people?

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By: Robin Greenwood http://abstractcritical.com/article/painting-after-cyrus/#comment-122004 Fri, 15 Mar 2013 11:18:10 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6685#comment-122004 If its just John B’s ‘unstoppable feedback loop’ them we are just going round in circles. I want progress (another myth/aspiration?)

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By: Sam http://abstractcritical.com/article/painting-after-cyrus/#comment-122000 Fri, 15 Mar 2013 11:16:59 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6685#comment-122000 Because it would get people making abstract art

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By: Robin Greenwood http://abstractcritical.com/article/painting-after-cyrus/#comment-121999 Fri, 15 Mar 2013 11:13:32 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6685#comment-121999 But you still haven’t answered why the devil we would want a new mythology. Of what use is it to us?

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By: Noela http://abstractcritical.com/article/painting-after-cyrus/#comment-121998 Fri, 15 Mar 2013 11:10:34 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6685#comment-121998 I agree with the points in John Holland’s post.
Mythology isn’t about the truth is it? I have not really been able to see the relevance of the myth and the process of painting or sculpture [obviously I am missing something]. It is true what Robin Greenwood says though, it won’t make the work any better.

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