Comments on: Natalie Dower: Line of Enquiry http://abstractcritical.com/article/natalie-dower-line-of-enquiry/ Abstract Critical is a not-for profit company aiming to establish a new critical context for all generations of artists involved with ambitious abstract art. Sun, 09 Nov 2014 17:23:33 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Danila Rumold http://abstractcritical.com/article/natalie-dower-line-of-enquiry/#comment-54818 Sun, 07 Oct 2012 15:28:58 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=4815#comment-54818 In response to Sam I too find it interesting that Kandinsky should be able to make such a statement before he was able to visualize that in his work. I believe that the intellectual knowing (thought) take time to integrate into experiential knowing (wisdom.) For the artist drawing provides an excellent way to explore such observations which then become fully “realized” in painting. This makes me curious to see if this process can be seen in Kandinsky’s drawings prior to his pure abstract paintings.

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By: Sam Cornish http://abstractcritical.com/article/natalie-dower-line-of-enquiry/#comment-11752 Sun, 06 May 2012 20:12:02 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=4815#comment-11752 Not knowing very much at all about Kandinsky, I find it interesting that that statement was made a decade before his own work became ‘constructive’.

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By: Alan Fowler http://abstractcritical.com/article/natalie-dower-line-of-enquiry/#comment-11716 Sun, 06 May 2012 10:59:01 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=4815#comment-11716 My particular interest in Natalie Dower’s work lies in her continuation of one aspect of the constructivist tradition which saw the process of producing the abstract image as the building of a meaningful whole from the assemblage of basic geometric elements, determined by a methematical/geoometric underpinning. The extraordinary Swiss painter, sculptor, architect and designer Max Bill can be seen as one of the principal earlier exponents of this approach. The result is what I described in an exhibition of systems art which I curated in 2008 at Southampton City Art Gallery as “a rational aesthetic” – imagery which rewards the eye for its beauty and clarity of line, form and colour; and the mind for the often subtle logic of its structure.

Abstraction of this kind is sometimes linked with minimalism – a fundamental error, in my view. Minimalism involves a reductive process – what Kenneth Martin once described as “a reduction to simple form of the complex scene before us”. Abstraction of the kind so clearly articulated by Dower involves the opposite – the construction of an expressive whole from a basic vocabulary of sinple components.

I find it fascinating that Dower – togther with, among others, Jeffrey Steele, Peter Lowe and Gillian Wise – continue to carry into the 21st century an approach to abstraction which was prefigured 100 years ago by Kandinskly when he wrote in 1912 that he foresaw a time when the relationship between elements in a painting could “be expressed in mathematical form”, and concluded that “the time was approaching “when the painter would be proud to declare his work constructive”.

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