Comments on: Frank Stella in Wolfsburg http://abstractcritical.com/article/frank-stella-in-wolfsburg/ Abstract Critical is a not-for profit company aiming to establish a new critical context for all generations of artists involved with ambitious abstract art. Sun, 09 Nov 2014 17:23:33 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Robert Linsley http://abstractcritical.com/article/frank-stella-in-wolfsburg/#comment-97410 Fri, 01 Feb 2013 12:00:11 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6595#comment-97410 I have just put up a new blog post on this debate. http://newabstraction.net

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By: Robert Linsley http://abstractcritical.com/article/frank-stella-in-wolfsburg/#comment-97160 Thu, 31 Jan 2013 12:16:48 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6595#comment-97160 “weirdness” is just a metaphor..

..for something that includes intelligence but is not limited to that

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By: Robin Greenwood http://abstractcritical.com/article/frank-stella-in-wolfsburg/#comment-97124 Thu, 31 Jan 2013 08:39:06 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6595#comment-97124 I agree with the sentiment – that a lot of British abstraction is safe – but not the suggested solution. The artworld has shedloads of weirdness, thanks. I want shining intelligence.

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By: Robert Linsley http://abstractcritical.com/article/frank-stella-in-wolfsburg/#comment-97057 Thu, 31 Jan 2013 03:44:22 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6595#comment-97057 My experience is different. I like the works, individually. I know a collector with 9 Moby Dicks, several other late works including sculptures, a Circuit, Indian Bird etc., so have lots of first hand. And I don’t have a pre-formed idea of what’s good. Also don’t see any ego-tripping—that kind of response is totally over my head.

I agree with what Sam says about Marsamxett Harbour. Quite a good piece.

In Sam’s article I noticed this:
…good as some of it [British abstraction] was it was also safe and seemed completely done. Perhaps abstract painting needs some weirdness, some unsolvable complexity.

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By: Robin Greenwood http://abstractcritical.com/article/frank-stella-in-wolfsburg/#comment-97009 Wed, 30 Jan 2013 21:47:14 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6595#comment-97009 Great looking building – pity about the art. Come on Robert, just admit he’s no good. You know you want to really. Just look at the great big ego-tripping nonsense of it all. Even super-liberal-see-it-from-both-sides-Sam has tried and failed to get much out of it, apart from the obvious.

Sam’s big point: ‘When I tried to take full account of a particular painting – to engage with its specifics – the results were often disappointing to say the least.’

That’s the killer comment.

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By: Robert Linsley http://abstractcritical.com/article/frank-stella-in-wolfsburg/#comment-96886 Wed, 30 Jan 2013 13:14:32 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6595#comment-96886 Sam, like you wonder if it there is any point in building off the wall or off the surface of the picture. Like you I am not sure that the different views offered by the projecting parts really add anything important to the works. I’m not sure the effort of building a picture/construction is worth it. On a more fundamental level, a decorated ready-made form also seems problematic – a deeper flaw.

However, unlike you I’m not bothered that side views don’t cohere the way that we expect front views to do. I also find that the forms are not completely fixed ahead of time, that they are cut, bent, variously scaled etc. But most of all I just feel the energy, and energy of invention. Increasingly I enjoy the paint handling, an aspect I used to think was pretty bad, but now appreciate for – again – energy and invention. And I must reflect that an artwork can be wrong through and through and still great.

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