Comments on: Ethan Cook – lobstee at Rod Barton, London http://abstractcritical.com/article/ethan-cook-lobstee-at-rod-barton-gallery-london/ Abstract Critical is a not-for profit company aiming to establish a new critical context for all generations of artists involved with ambitious abstract art. Sun, 09 Nov 2014 17:23:33 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: James H http://abstractcritical.com/article/ethan-cook-lobstee-at-rod-barton-gallery-london/#comment-326211 Thu, 05 Dec 2013 23:32:26 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7725#comment-326211 Hi Sam – well, it’s not so much that minimalism is simply about showing human weakness but that it points to the Sisyphean nature of making art – particularly abstract art – and therefore the scale and absurdity of the endeavour itself (there’s something sublime in that), as well as its internal paradoxes.

I think that, however you conceive of an artwork, it will fall short of conveying/capturing/penetrating/unifying in some objectively satisfying sense – we’re always working with something elusive and potential. So, we do something impossible but, in doing so, we constantly create new possibilities.

Tracks in the snow – in the sense I think you’re referring to – are just human traces of a banal activity (we’re supposed to find romance in absence or something), but (good) minimalist artworks are human traces of a monumental activity and the beauty comes just as much from the success they do achieve in justifying themselves, as it does from the gap between that success and everything that’s (im)possible.

Order is good, but totalising, and in the failure we inspire further failures.

(fail better etc.)

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By: Sam http://abstractcritical.com/article/ethan-cook-lobstee-at-rod-barton-gallery-london/#comment-326025 Thu, 05 Dec 2013 19:24:06 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7725#comment-326025 After the complexity of the argument that precedes it, I find the conclusion that minimalism is all about showing some kind of human weakness a little bit of a let-down. It doesn’t seem much above photos of tracks in the snow, worn banisters or scuff-marks on the treads… I think – hope – humanity might show itself in the achievement of order, even if not ‘perfect’ order, as much as in a show of weakness or failure.

The bit on skin seems similar to this show in NY http://www.twocoatsofpaint.com/2013/12/an-invitation-skin-at-painting-center.html

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By: john glenn http://abstractcritical.com/article/ethan-cook-lobstee-at-rod-barton-gallery-london/#comment-324503 Wed, 04 Dec 2013 13:52:42 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7725#comment-324503 seems too reliant on the others. great name dropping, but are any of his heroes alive anymore?

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By: Ragnhild Lunden http://abstractcritical.com/article/ethan-cook-lobstee-at-rod-barton-gallery-london/#comment-323392 Tue, 03 Dec 2013 13:19:39 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7725#comment-323392 celestial is probebly more correct than etherial “eterisk ” in Swedish

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By: Ragnhild Lunden http://abstractcritical.com/article/ethan-cook-lobstee-at-rod-barton-gallery-london/#comment-323388 Tue, 03 Dec 2013 13:14:48 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7725#comment-323388 Certainly a subtle almost etherial experience of feelings.

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