Comments on: Brancaster Chronicle No. 12: Robin Greenwood Sculptures http://abstractcritical.com/article/brancaster-chronicle-no-12-robin-greenwood-sculptures/ Abstract Critical is a not-for profit company aiming to establish a new critical context for all generations of artists involved with ambitious abstract art. Sun, 09 Nov 2014 17:23:33 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Peter Stott http://abstractcritical.com/article/brancaster-chronicle-no-12-robin-greenwood-sculptures/#comment-953502 Sun, 12 Oct 2014 11:33:33 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=8606#comment-953502 Surely you can’t expect anyone to take these objects seriously unless they do something, in this case I think they do do something, and that is to perform a pictorial function as a thing to be looked at in different ways. It displays by its nature that it is an art object, for what else could it be? As such, it is a thing specifically to be looked at and nothing else, for it provides no other function. The pieces are not great as eye candy, compared to women, cars, etc. and they have no saving grace as functional objects, so there must be something else to them. I think it’s their ability as tools for practicing different way of looking spatially, but NOT ABOUT SPACE,about FORM. Not that radical.

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By: Terry Ryall http://abstractcritical.com/article/brancaster-chronicle-no-12-robin-greenwood-sculptures/#comment-947132 Fri, 10 Oct 2014 20:05:44 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=8606#comment-947132 In response to Peter, I’m not sure what it is that I have said that would lead you to ask if matter was in some way alive to me. If I have given the impression that I think the question of whether matter is alive is somehow relevant to Robin’s sculpture then that certainly wasn’t my intention. I wouldn’t use the word ‘alive’ in relation to any sculpture as it could only have a metaphorical intent.

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By: Peter Stott http://abstractcritical.com/article/brancaster-chronicle-no-12-robin-greenwood-sculptures/#comment-945619 Fri, 10 Oct 2014 11:16:03 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=8606#comment-945619 I see. Matter is in some way alive to you?

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By: Terry Ryall http://abstractcritical.com/article/brancaster-chronicle-no-12-robin-greenwood-sculptures/#comment-943307 Thu, 09 Oct 2014 20:29:37 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=8606#comment-943307 Hi Robin,
Thanks for this, it throws a very different light on to your pieces and apologies for my embarrassing misunderstanding of the origins and subsequent manipulation of your material(I do get a lot of things wrong!).

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By: Robin Greenwood http://abstractcritical.com/article/brancaster-chronicle-no-12-robin-greenwood-sculptures/#comment-942756 Thu, 09 Oct 2014 16:59:20 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=8606#comment-942756 Hi Terry.
I don’t think I inherit a great deal of “narrative” or anything much else, since I buy almost all my steel from new. The days of looking for interesting shapes etc. at the scrapyard are long gone, partly because of health and safety (and lack of scrapyards), but also because I choose anyway to make everything from scratch – i.e. from new flat plate, mostly. I do, of course, have my own scrap-pile, but I find even that is of limited use.

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By: Terry Ryall http://abstractcritical.com/article/brancaster-chronicle-no-12-robin-greenwood-sculptures/#comment-942488 Thu, 09 Oct 2014 15:14:34 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=8606#comment-942488 Well, I wouldn’t think of it in literal historical terms because it is a new entity made up of a combination of diversely shaped bits and pieces some of which might be re-worked by Robin and some not. What I would see is a number of diverse shapes and forms that have been combined to make a spatial sculpture. Inevitably its totality is partly defined by the differing character of its constituent parts and what I am trying (perhaps clumsily) to suggest is that there is an inherited energy in these pieces of steel that is or could be a factor in the final feel of the work. It is of course only part of the story.

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By: Peter Stott http://abstractcritical.com/article/brancaster-chronicle-no-12-robin-greenwood-sculptures/#comment-942379 Thu, 09 Oct 2014 14:31:57 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=8606#comment-942379 What is it now, though?, If you saw one of those slithering and grinding down the High St, what would you think of it, in your historical terms?

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By: Terry Ryall http://abstractcritical.com/article/brancaster-chronicle-no-12-robin-greenwood-sculptures/#comment-942115 Thu, 09 Oct 2014 12:56:35 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=8606#comment-942115 How do you start? A good question in relation to the making of sculpture,especially abstract sculpture. In order to try to get (or propose)a fuller picture of Robin’s sculpture in terms other than what is physically being achieved (or not achieved) through the literal use of the material (it seems to me that this is well served by the discussion)it will be necessary to look further back in the evolution of these works than where/how Robin started. I say this because I think that there is more to the character of these sculptures than can be described solely by visual analysis of how the material has been manipulated ie. what each part is doing in relation to the whole. I’m not sure what this ‘more’ is exactly but I think part of the answer might lay in the narrative of the material itself, how it was produced originally but more especially the journeys undertaken by sheet, pipe, RSJ etc. through the building and engineering sectors, leading finally to that magical heap of off-cuts, components, and remnants in the scrapyard. There is a residual energy in each piece of steel in Robin’s heap that is locked in through its history of making/manipulation but which of course might undergo additional alteration before becoming part of a final work. This residual energy of each piece of steel becomes dynamic when combined with other pieces, each taking its place and contributing to a larger entity. The essentially Romantic idea that the remote and re-contextualised history of material can still have some part to play in the final feel(dare I say spirit?)of Robin’s work might also apply to the collages of John Bunker.

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By: Robin Greenwood http://abstractcritical.com/article/brancaster-chronicle-no-12-robin-greenwood-sculptures/#comment-939287 Wed, 08 Oct 2014 20:21:32 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=8606#comment-939287 I’m flattered to get three comments. Just a pity I have no idea what you’re talking about. You do realise, Peter, that it would be very dangerous for me to make heavy-metal welded sculpture whilst out of my brain on drugs/alchohol. Mind you, “dangerous” seems to be in at the moment…

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By: Peter Stott http://abstractcritical.com/article/brancaster-chronicle-no-12-robin-greenwood-sculptures/#comment-937964 Wed, 08 Oct 2014 13:58:46 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=8606#comment-937964 If one stretches one arm, out towards the picture then stick one’s forefinger further forward still, while pulling the thumb back, to make a bow shape. If one then positions the thumb and forefinger over two points on the sculpture image, in one’s line of sight, one can soon comprehend how limited one’s perception of pictorial form is and following on from that, what visions of pictorial form might lie beyond that limit.

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