Comments on: Baselitz – Farewell Bill http://abstractcritical.com/article/baselitz-farewell-bill/ Abstract Critical is a not-for profit company aiming to establish a new critical context for all generations of artists involved with ambitious abstract art. Sun, 09 Nov 2014 17:23:33 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Anthony Seymour http://abstractcritical.com/article/baselitz-farewell-bill/#comment-463726 Sat, 12 Apr 2014 15:43:24 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7974#comment-463726 The empathy & facture of Baselitz’ work often has a deep magic.

The 1990 ex. at D’Offay was indeed a pinnacle & the next show “HammerGreen” in 1992, so it would have been great to have seen some more of those again or so I hoped at the R.A. Retro, although it was a memorable opportunity to experience the multi-part mind/room filling installation of “The Forty Five” from 1989.

Carrying on now,(or maybe even one day something enriching for society), it does feel there is a very confident and independent vibe to the maestro’s creativity – so I am glad he does it just for the Hell of it…..

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By: Peter Stott http://abstractcritical.com/article/baselitz-farewell-bill/#comment-463595 Sat, 12 Apr 2014 13:51:34 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7974#comment-463595 In terms of seeing an image upside down as a way-in to seeing visual data anew, his works contribute nothing to pictoriality of any note, here, and from what I’ve seen, not elsewhere. The works are nihilism ‘at its worse(:-)), a one way trip to insanity via art.

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By: Peter Stott http://abstractcritical.com/article/baselitz-farewell-bill/#comment-463389 Sat, 12 Apr 2014 10:51:48 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7974#comment-463389 Paint a picture upside down… One idea and not a very good one at that, repeated over and over? Not even his idea, Malcom Morley was doing it over a decade before. Just more Deutchland uber-alles junk to me. Let’s make pictures bigger than everyone else, like that ridiculous Polke show at Tate Modern.

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By: Anthony Seymour http://abstractcritical.com/article/baselitz-farewell-bill/#comment-461102 Fri, 11 Apr 2014 10:39:19 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7974#comment-461102 Baselitz is a sort of Superman really with no problem swatting knats frankly. So he gets provoked by nincompoops, but anybody could see he is practically head over heels in league with another real painter like Joan Mitchell – also famous for not suffering fools gladly.
As with De Kooning who wrote about retaining contact with a child-like magic as a serious artist with no doubt a high IQ, it is evident that Baselitz is indomitable.
Although like he says he would have to be locked up if his marriage had not lasted, but maybe this alienation and misunderstanding of sensibility between suffering artist and obtuse audience has its history anyway – look at Goya.
Bye Bye.

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By: Peter Stott http://abstractcritical.com/article/baselitz-farewell-bill/#comment-429557 Tue, 25 Mar 2014 01:06:13 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7974#comment-429557 I don’t know what the title of these works is, but fuckhead springs to mind.Is that the point?

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By: Sam http://abstractcritical.com/article/baselitz-farewell-bill/#comment-423555 Fri, 21 Mar 2014 06:53:18 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7974#comment-423555 I couldn’t really get on with these paintings. The show is dramatic when you first look but there is not much to see in any one painting beyond the initial drama – the upsidedownness works to keep the paintings active so (unless you stood on your head in the exhibition) there is always a bit of the picture you cannot get at. Of course trying to really see the paintings is here implicitly characterised as be a slightly overly-fastidious thing to do – you are meant to be struck or swept along; and anyway Baselitz signals pretty obviously that he doesn’t care either way…

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By: Luke Elwes http://abstractcritical.com/article/baselitz-farewell-bill/#comment-422467 Thu, 20 Mar 2014 11:46:27 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=7974#comment-422467 You can feel the artist’s excitement as he recovers himself as a painter in the rough power of these huge canvases, with De Kooning giving him a way out of what seemed like the (increasingly sterile) impasse of his ‘remix’ period, and he’s returned the favour with gusto, celebrating rather than mimicking his mentor’s mark making: not just with the familiar swipes of milky pink and lemon yellow shot through with black of De Kooning’s work from the 1960s but also with the loose reference to his earlier breakthrough painting, ‘Excavation’ 1950, in the more densely worked surface of ‘Far Belle Will’ 2013.

It also clearly shows the continuing dialogue not just between painting and sculpture but also with print making, from the carved lines of his chiaroscuro woodcuts to the range of incised marks and heavy tones (a mixture of drypoint, etching and aquatint) that he developed during the 1960s in his series of ‘hero’ images; in this sense the current display at the British Museum (Germany Divided: Baselitz and His Generation, until August 31st) lends a significant added dimension to the ongoing work.

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