Comments on: Antoni Tàpies http://abstractcritical.com/article/antoni-tapies/ Abstract Critical is a not-for profit company aiming to establish a new critical context for all generations of artists involved with ambitious abstract art. Sun, 09 Nov 2014 17:23:33 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Patrick Jones http://abstractcritical.com/article/antoni-tapies/#comment-137529 Fri, 12 Apr 2013 20:27:16 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6797#comment-137529 In defence of Tapies,I have seen a terrific work at Waddingtons last year.Called Bed,it was exactly that,including crudely drawn headboard.However the majority of the huge painting[10ft tall]was occupied by the tumbling white sheets,in rolled white marble dust,on a black wooden surface.Without wishing to be drawn into semiotics,it was memorable for its re-experiencing something from life,just in the way Joyce does in Ulysees.It was every crumpled,stained ,slept in Bed[including hotel and hospital]we have ever slept in.I better go before Tracey Emin is mentioned.It was so much more interesting than a state funeral!

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By: Robert Linsley http://abstractcritical.com/article/antoni-tapies/#comment-136845 Thu, 11 Apr 2013 20:56:32 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6797#comment-136845 About Tapies I can’t say until I see a proper show one day. But sometimes I get the feeling that art looks like it’s made for contemporary galleries, that it’s just proper modern art, that it has a kind of feel typical of modern art. Sounds vague, but it’s just an instinctual reaction. When I feel that, I lose interest in the work. Can’t really explain it. Thought that the reviewer here felt something like, but maybe not.
I never feel that way about the unmentionable.

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By: John Holland http://abstractcritical.com/article/antoni-tapies/#comment-136794 Thu, 11 Apr 2013 19:14:30 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6797#comment-136794 Robert- Good luck with the goosing- but I don’t quite understand what you mean by either ‘modern’ or ‘period feel’ in this context.

Does Tapies’ work look particularly ‘of its time’? He seems to me to be part of a loose group of post war European artists (including Beuys, Kounellis, Arte Povera), who’s work uses a paradoxical tension between an almost excremental materialism and a kind of atavistic mysticism. It saw itself in opposition to other more explicitly ‘modern’, more ‘Positivist’, art. It had the look of its time partly in the way it opposed its time,the way it rather desperately looked to some pre-modern spiritual order. You could say this is in fact one manifestation of the times, essentially in the way it shares Conceptualism’s belief in the way physical substance can be imbued with an aura of Meaning beyond, or outside of, any particularities of relational form, like a Haunting.
In this sense, formal development is a bit of an irrelevant concept here, as it’s the metaphysical message to society that is important.

You will be fined if you gratuitously mention Frank Stella again.

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By: Robert Linsley http://abstractcritical.com/article/antoni-tapies/#comment-136749 Thu, 11 Apr 2013 17:49:55 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6797#comment-136749 I’m keeping an open mind on Tapies, because I don’t really know how to take him. The review suggests he may be an example of something I see more frequently – “modern” art, meaning work that looks of its time, if that makes any sense. I have the feeling that despite their best efforts, what artists actually accomplish is not necessarily what they strive for, or what their audiences believe they see. A conventional period feel is something one is not aware of until the period is past. But that’s a pretty general observation.

Coincidentally I have been reading his memoirs, which I find strangely lifeless and dull, but the two most recent posts on my blog are drawn from there (http://newabstraction.net).

The overall sameness of Tapies work may be a function of professionalism, but that may also be the source of our period feel, so it can hardly be avoided. For an artist who has used his success in the best possible way, and DOES NOT repeat himself, I propose Frank Stella, but then the readers/writers of abcrit are strangely resistant to his merits.

I think I will stroll over to the Gillian Ayres article and goose Robin Greenwood.

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By: Robin Greenwood http://abstractcritical.com/article/antoni-tapies/#comment-136612 Thu, 11 Apr 2013 12:39:39 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6797#comment-136612 So this is Ben nailing the means of his best successes:

“…painted into and onto with broad or scrawling accumulations of black paint… some appear to be the imprint of a discarded object, others call to mind the thick loaded swish of a city tagger or the cathartic immediacy of gestural abstraction. In ‘Escrits i formes sobre materia’ some marks open up crude spatial possibilities with a few roughly hewn lines, others present strangely inscrutable pictographs and others still appear as though the thoughtless imprints of a bored finger on a beach.”

That doesn’t sound too successful… In fact, they never quite do anything, really, do they? Apart, of course, from the really important thing of “allowing [Ben's] mind to drift across a plethora of visual excrement beyond the gallery walls”. Well, nuff said.

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By: Robin Greenwood http://abstractcritical.com/article/antoni-tapies/#comment-136582 Thu, 11 Apr 2013 11:50:42 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6797#comment-136582 More seriously, it would be good to know, John B, what achievements you think make Tapies ‘a great artist’, and who in the history of art you think he is comparable with. Because, for the life of me, he looks like a con-merchant of the worst order. I think even Ben, who obviously had a youthful crush, seems to see through the guy now, if one reads between the lines. Work that was “churned out over his final decades” doesn’t sound too “great” to me. He sets an awful example to impressionable young artists like yourself…ha!

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By: Robin Greenwood http://abstractcritical.com/article/antoni-tapies/#comment-136571 Thu, 11 Apr 2013 11:40:33 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6797#comment-136571 Good to see you parodying your own writing style, Sam, with a genuine sense of the slapstick. One day you’ll aspire to irony.

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By: Sam http://abstractcritical.com/article/antoni-tapies/#comment-136533 Thu, 11 Apr 2013 10:33:18 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6797#comment-136533 Bleedin’ Welding: An Exhibition of New Sculpture by Robin Greenwood

As Greenwood presses his angle-grinder down, the sparks fly like blood and the steel shudders like a corpse on the operating table.* At once living agent and inert matter these works [continues..]

* I’m not sure corpses to shudder on the operating table

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By: Sam http://abstractcritical.com/article/antoni-tapies/#comment-136528 Thu, 11 Apr 2013 10:26:44 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6797#comment-136528 perhaps you have a tendency to think in cliches?

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By: John Bunker http://abstractcritical.com/article/antoni-tapies/#comment-136222 Thu, 11 Apr 2013 00:09:41 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?post_type=article&p=6797#comment-136222 Lov’n it!

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