Comments on: Anthony Caro http://abstractcritical.com/article/anthony-caro/ Abstract Critical is a not-for profit company aiming to establish a new critical context for all generations of artists involved with ambitious abstract art. Sun, 09 Nov 2014 17:23:33 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 By: Robin Greenwood http://abstractcritical.com/article/anthony-caro/#comment-280365 Sat, 26 Oct 2013 18:00:18 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=3423#comment-280365 Robert,
As to three-dimensionality, see the bit about the Degas above.

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By: Sam http://abstractcritical.com/article/anthony-caro/#comment-280339 Sat, 26 Oct 2013 17:23:32 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=3423#comment-280339 This from Caro in 1979 – Certain things about the physical world and certain things about what it is like to be in a body are tied up together. Verticality, horizontality, gravity, all of these pertain both to the outside physical world and to the fact that we have bodies, as evidently does the size of a sculpture. These things are of importance in both my early figurative and the later abstract sculpture. In the abstract sculpture they are crucial.

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By: Robert Linsley http://abstractcritical.com/article/anthony-caro/#comment-280217 Sat, 26 Oct 2013 13:20:07 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=3423#comment-280217 Sorry, a computer glitch

The Caro piece I just put on the blog is an interior, but that’s a small distinction. When his work is landscape the figure is implied. In fact the viewer is that figure – a conventional trope. It starts to appear that the figurative is very hard to escape, at least in sculpture. And I’m feeling myself toward the thought that the full three dimensionality that you desire will also not escape. The achievement of full roundedness beyond the literally, factually given will entail some confrontation with what it means for a person to be many-sided, the full roundedness of personality, always embedded in personal encounters, always metaphorical and full of misunderstanding and partial perception.

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By: Robert Linsley http://abstractcritical.com/article/anthony-caro/#comment-280213 Sat, 26 Oct 2013 13:09:01 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=3423#comment-280213 Notice that he is content with a literal three dimensionality, which provokes the thought that the “sides” of a person are all metaphorical, and that all such metaphors emerge out of the difficulties of face to face encounter.

The full roundedness of a person is often hard to see. I’m under the impression that you want a sculpture to be literally fully rounded and that you also want that roundedness to be achieved in some way, not just given.

When Caro’s work is landscape, as in the piece I just put up on e blog

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By: Robin Greenwood http://abstractcritical.com/article/anthony-caro/#comment-280187 Sat, 26 Oct 2013 12:19:21 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=3423#comment-280187 Yes, less abstract than we have previously thought, perhaps (though this doesn’t preclude formalism). I also think his insistence on ‘character’ as defining the quality of a sculpture is another instance of his covert figuration.

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By: Robert Linsley http://abstractcritical.com/article/anthony-caro/#comment-280172 Sat, 26 Oct 2013 11:50:58 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=3423#comment-280172 He said that his work is “literally” 3-D, which it obviously is, and then drew an equivalence between its two-sidedness (front and back) and the two-sidedness of a person (front and back). From this I draw the conclusion that Caro is less of a formalist than we may think, and that the figurative aspect of his work runs deeper than perhaps anyone expected – that’s it not a matter of style but a fundamental stance.

Fried has gone on about what he calls “facingness,” which also draws together “opticality,” flatness and the tableau.

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By: Robin Greenwood http://abstractcritical.com/article/anthony-caro/#comment-280104 Sat, 26 Oct 2013 09:15:24 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=3423#comment-280104 Sorry Robert, what answer from Caro? You don’t mean…, no you couldn’t.

And I don’t want sculpture to have any sides, and wasn’t aware that normal people had them either (other than left, right and nasty).

Which bit of your blog deals with this?

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By: Robert Linsley http://abstractcritical.com/article/anthony-caro/#comment-279902 Sat, 26 Oct 2013 03:03:50 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=3423#comment-279902 Robin, I thought Caro’s answer to your probing of the problem of frontality was a very interesting one. It sounds like you want a sculpture to have more sides than a person normally does, and if it’s put that way I find it hard to object. Anyway, I posted something about it on my blog – Saturday. http://newabstraction.net

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By: Robin Greenwood http://abstractcritical.com/article/anthony-caro/#comment-278476 Thu, 24 Oct 2013 13:02:13 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=3423#comment-278476 RIP Tony Caro. It’s the end of the beginning of abstract sculpture.

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By: Terry Ryall http://abstractcritical.com/article/anthony-caro/#comment-7372 Sat, 18 Feb 2012 16:46:02 +0000 http://abstractcritical.com/?p=3423#comment-7372 So many points to examine/comment on here and none seem to be side-trips. In the spirit of less is more I’ll choose just one for now.
I hesitate to disagree with Tony Caro (one of my sculpture heroes) but I will anyway, at least with his statement that sculpture is a language “not of the world”. I would argue, whether one believes sculpture to be a language or not, that it is most definitely of this world and that it is the duty of an ambitious sculpture (abstract or figurative) to try and project through its physical and visual reality (not its literal qualities) something about the world that we inhabit and our place in it.
If “not of the world” then Whereof?

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